reviews and articles!!

The Young Mothers:

“The concert at Klubben/Studentersamfundet was a display of musical prowess, but primarily in how such skills can trigger creativity. And maybe the most impressive with the concert was Håker Flaten’s ability to put together a band which to the degrees could manifest his musical visions.” Trygve Lundemo/Addressavisen (March 2015)

“Those who made the trip to the Cultural Center in Oppdal Saturday night, got to experience a concert full of energy and dominated by virtuosity and true joy of playing. The band touched everything from pure jazz, with influences from both metal rock (with vocal growling), punk and hiphop (with several rap sequences) to afrobeat, to mention some.” – Morgan Frelsøy/OPP (March 2015)

“The young mothers, bassist Ingebrigt Håker Flaten and five (male) musicians from Texas, had left the baby carriage and turned out the light in the child’s room when they captured Vossahallen Friday night. For the ferocity they let loose was not something for the faint hearted children. The young mothers gave everything and would not stop until the vibraphone was destroyed and all the strings were hanging dead around the neck of the guitar. The audience shouts ecstatically until last tone rings out and we, the new kids to The Young Mothers, walks out into the Vossa night with our hair standing straight up in excitement.” – Vossajazz.no (March 2015)

“Mad complete and beautiful music at @nextbop SXSW event right now. These cats from Austin sound like a Saharan metal band with jazz instruments. NEW music! -blog post from our SXSW performance at El Sapo (March 2014)

“Ingebrigt Håker Flaten reminds us that jazz is the musical equivalent of a dark star, a musical black hole, absorbing all musical energy and classifications. Sure, let’s not call this jazz, because it would alienate 99% of fans. But jazz, in truth, it is.” – Marc Corroto/All About Jazz

“An unpredictable and challenging set from serious players who have earned the epithet “heavy hitters” and are out to prove it to a frightening extent. One suspects a live gig by these bruisers would be pretty intense.” – The Sound Projector

“Listen and hear how sophisticated limits are broken and shadows overjumped. All of this happens as nonchalant and playful that it will give you tears of joy in your eyes.” -Freistil

“This album should be the biggest business card that help The Young Mothers to be invited to all the jazz clubs and international festivals next year, having a certain respect for themselves. Just brilliant!” – Salt-peanuts.eu

“If a mother’s work is unfortunately never done, the work of these men is so shining that it really slips from sun to sun.” – Chain D.L.K.

“Once you get past what you do or don’t expect from this band, you can relax and appreciate. It goes at it and succeeds by taking the music to places that feel right, with conviction and fire. It is cutting-edge yet it incorporates something of what is happening outside the realms of free music in the insular sense. That’s healthy when it works. It works.” – Gapplegate Guitar and Bass Blog

“The sextet has set out to not only blur genre barriers but smash them to pieces. A band that combines jazz, indie rock, hip hop, surf rock, and soul—sometimes within one movement of one piece—can only be regarded as an entity beyond classification.” – Cory Perla/Artvoice.com

“It’s sort of like a hybrid between mike dillon band, frank zappa, ornette coleman, atoms for peace, death grips, charles mingus, some symphonic metal i’m not well-versed enough to reference…..you’re going to be overwhelmed either way, but some of you will find it to be extraordinarily rewarding, as opposed to off-puttingly disorienting and chaotic.” – Jared Buchsbaum

“I’ve enjoyed blasting this on my car stereo with the sunroof open. It’s a jolt of energy that gets you going before work, that’s for sure. And it’s a helluva lot of fun.” – Improvised(blog.blogspot.com)

“This is levitation music, good for dancing on your feet as well as in your head. A Mother’s Work Is Never Done sounds like an early candidate for my end-of-2014 top ten list!” – Ken Shimamoto/TheStashDauber

“The Young Mothers are hydraulic pumpers. The album is a grenade in the head.” — Mark Rappaport/CD- Journal (Japan)

“The Young Mothers is the coolest sound to come out of Austin since the punk scene of the 80s. ” – Chris Brown

Bandcamp/Hans Shteamer

The Stash Daubner (Ken Shimamoto)

Chicago: ChicagoReader (Peter Margasak)

Chicago: ChicagoMusic.org (Andrew Choate)

Cleveland: CleveScene.com (Jeff Niesel)

Buffalo : Artvoice.com (Cory Perla)

Ingebrigt Håker Flaten solo:

“On Steel, Flaten combines technical facality with depth of expression in a manner that recalls past masters like Paul Chambers, Wilbur Ware, Charlie Haden, and Malachi Favors. His attack can turn percussive, whether he’s playing pizzicato or arco. At other times, his lines have a vocalized quality. And he’s a master of bowed harmonics that can make his bass sound like a reed instrument or a whole string section, even without electronic augmention. On Birds, Flaten employs an arsenal of electronic effects to make his bass sound like Japanese flutes, a Hendrixoid guitar or an angry insect. The music unfolds episodically, recalling the 60’s and 70’s masterworks of Stockhausen, Takehisa Kosugi, and Richard Pinhas.”  – The Stash Dauber

“The Nordic bassist, exciled for a while in Austin, shows with this LP that in addition to being one of the best with the four strings at present, he is also a remarkable composer and arranger.” – Tomajazz

The IHF Chicago Sextet:

“The final concert in the garden was also one of the best, with bassist Ingebrigt Håker Flaten’s Chicago Sextet achieving rare levels of drive and invention, with fellow Norwegian Ola Kvernberg channeling the ghosts of jazz-rock violin and an assemblage of the Midwest’s finest. Guitarist Jeff Parker and drummer Frank Rosaly were as adept at overdriven rock as free jazz. Vibraphonist Jason Adasiewicz and saxophonist Dave Rempis were brilliant, the latter’s unaccompanied exploration of baritone multiphonics lingering long after the festival’s final note.” – All About Jazz